FacebookTwitter    Archive | www.aapa-ports.org September 23, 2013
   

Cargo Trends: Long Beach, St. Lawrence, Virginia

Print Print this Article | Send to Colleague

Containerized cargo volume at the Port of Long Beach reached 630,292 TEUs in August, a 16 percent increase from a year ago and its highest monthly total since October 2007. The U.S. Saint Lawrence Seaway Development Corporation reports U.S. Great Lakes ports spent August working on infrastructure projects and securing new cargo shipments. The Virginia Port Authority reports container throughput at its Hampton Roads terminals totaled 198,329 TEUs in August, up 5.1 percent from a year ago.

Long Beach: August Container Volume at a Six-Year High 

Containerized cargo volume at the Port of Long Beach reached 630,292 TEUs in August, a 16 percent increase from a year ago, with double-digit percentage gains for both imports and exports. That made August the port’s busiest month since October 2007. August through October is traditionally the "peak season" for ocean-borne imports, as retailers prepare for a rise in buying as the end-of-the-year holidays approach.

Volume for the calendar through August was up 13.6 percent to almost 2.3 million TEUs, the port’s highest total for that eight-month period since 2007

For the port’s latest cargo numbers, click here.

St. Lawrence Seaway Shipping Season Shows Glimmers of Optimism

The U.S. Saint Lawrence Seaway Development Corporation reports U.S. Great Lakes ports spent the generally slow month of August working on infrastructure projects and securing new cargo shipments. 

"So far in 2013, we have seen general cargo volumes double over last year at the Port of Toledo," said Joe Cappel, PPM®, director of cargo development for the Toledo-Lucas County Port Authority. "This is a good sign that the port is building momentum and that our investments in the equipment and infrastructure at the facility are paying off. We're also excited about the progress of construction at the new Ironville terminal, which will expand our capacity for cargo storage and handling."

At Burns Harbor, the Ports of Indiana recorded cargo tonnage increases of 28 percent for August and 21 percent for the year, thanks largely to demand for fertilizer, semi-finished steel and steel-related raw materials and byproducts.

"We have had four consecutive months of increased shipments," said Burns Harbor Port Director Rick Heimann. "Our port companies handle a diverse mix of cargoes, but being located in the steel capital of North America certainly has a tremendous impact on volumes coming through this port on ocean, lake and barge routes."

Construction currently underway at the port includes a mainline rail project that is scheduled to be finished by the end of September. 

Overall, the Seaway handled 19 million metric tons of cargo from its March 22 season opening date through August 31, down 19 percent from a year ago. On a brighter note, U.S. grain, the waterway’s predominant cargo, jumped 37 percent. Other gainers included scrap metal (+3 percent) and pig iron (+6 percent). Iron ore and coal posted declines of 15 percent and 2.0 percent, respectively. 

Virginia: August TEUs Top 198,000, Rail Containers Exceed 40,000 

The Virginia Port Authority reports container throughput at its Hampton Roads terminals totaled 198,329 TEUs in August. That was up 5.1 percent from a year ago, reflecting increases of 1.8 percent and 8.8 percent, respectively by imports and exports. 

Overall, it was the port’s fourth best monthly showing of 2013 and brought throughput for the year to almost under 1.5 million TEUs, an increase of 6.9 percent from the comparable eight-month period of 2012.  

"We expect the heavy flow of peak-season cargo to continue, but as the retail season approaches we expect it to taper a bit, which is normal," said Rodney Oliver, PPM, the VPA’s interim executive director. 

The VPA also reports that in August for the first month ever more than 40,000 containers arrived and departed the port by rail. "We expect continued heavy rail volume for the foreseeable future," said Mr. Oliver, "and are making several operational changes to accommodate the growth.

Other August data reported by the VPA point to gains of 65.4 percent for breakbulk cargo and 8.9 percent for containerized cargo tonnage and declines in ship calls and containers transported by barge via the James River between Richmond and Hampton Roads.

The attachment provides additional detail. 
 

Share Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on LinkedIn