www.agc.org • July 2014  
         
 

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MSA - The Safety Company
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Board of Certified Safety Professionals (BCSP)
CLICKSAFETY
Events

Safety & Health Conference 
July 16-18, 2014 
Portland, Ore. 
Construction safety and health is vital for the success of the industry. More than 150 industry professionals participate in the development of regulatory and legislative activity on both a national and local level, assist in the development and creation of new safety training programs and products and hear the latest initiatives from OSHA and other industry experts at this twice-yearly conference.

Fall Protection Training in the Construction Industry 
August 4, 2014 
8 a.m. - 5 p.m. 
Madison, Wis. 
Each year, falls consistently account for the greatest number of fatalities in the construction industry. Over the past five years, on average, more than 350 workers were killed each year in construction-related falls according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. AGC of America is pleased to offer this one-day training program based on OSHA standards and best practices to answer the need for quality fall protection training within the industry. 

Fall Protection Training in the Construction Industry 
August 5, 2014 
8 a.m. - 5 p.m.
Milwaukee, Wis. 
Each year, falls consistently account for the greatest number of fatalities in the construction industry. Over the past five years, on average, more than 350 workers were killed each year in construction-related falls according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. AGC of America is pleased to offer this one-day training program based on OSHA standards and best practices to answer the need for quality fall protection training within the industry. 


 
Chapter News
The Toqua District of the Great Smoky Mountains Council of The Boy Scouts of America held a four-day day camp themed "Cubstruction." Kim Enoch, AGC of Tennessee's director of safety and loss control, spent one of the days with 219 Cub Scouts teaching them about construction safety. AGC was excited to participate and so were the kids!  

AGC – Knoxville donated hard hats and safety-related stickers to each child that participated in the program.  It was a great opportunity to get out in the community and promote safety and the multitude of exciting jobs the construction industry has to offer.
 
Best Practices
BY ROBERT D. RICE

For a construction contractor, few four letter words are as dreaded as dust. Every construction site must be concerned with the accumulation of dust and the containment therein. Inadequate dust control precautions will result in problems that can be physically and financially catastrophic. Though weather conditions may arise that may threaten construction site workers as well as the surrounding community, expert professional precautions must be established well in advance of all eventualities. 

Any activity at a construction site causes dust. That includes, but not limited to, on site preparation, vehicle and worker movements, as well as uncovering any stockpiles that may have been hidden before construction began. Unsafe working conditions may result, leading to breathing problems relating to the nose, throat and lungs. This is especially troublesome for individuals with existing breathing difficulties. The resulting health conditions may include all types of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD.) including bronchitis, emphysema, silicosis and occupational asthma. 

Dust greatly reduces visibility. This can be in the form of vehicular and pedestrian traffic patterns. Property damage to the surrounding community can be widespread and quickly worsen if the construction site dust is not properly contained. The damage may also be environmental — enter the E.P.A. Inadequate dust containment may lead to fines or the construction site being shut down.

Construction companies should alert, not alarm, the community near the construction site, informing businesses and residents that construction activity will soon commence nearby. The letter, addressed to each household and business, should outline the name of the company doing the work, company address and contact telephone numbers, in the event of any problems that may occur as the result of said construction being performed. 

Pre-construction precautionary steps should include: 
  1. Limiting cleared areas.
  2. Installing physical barriers, (e.g., mesh fences and tarps, emission control blankets and fiber rolls). These devices must be dug fully into the ground to prevent leakage from beneath.
  3. Traffic control in and around the site (i.e., use paved roads whenever possible).
  4. Diligent care involving earth-moving equipment.
  5. Watering vehicles that may use dust suppression and erosion control. Over-watering may lead to soil erosion. 
  6. Proper vehicles for soil compaction.
  7. Environmental and chemical stabilization. 
  8. Daily and post site clean-up, including proper stockpile management,  proper placement of containment filter bags around sewer and drainage  outlets.
These are several courses of actions that the construction company should take to minimize the problems of construction site dust. Failing to adhere to these steps could result in work stoppage and costly litigation incurred by the contractor, the site supervisors, owners and other principals.

References:
5. Soils Control International

Robert D. Rice is a freelance writer living in New Jersey. He attended Bowling Green State University and received a B.S. in economics.

 
Member News
More than 1,100 PC Construction employee-owners and project subcontractors participated in detailed safety training and fall prevention events at the company's jobsites along the east coast. 

OSHA's National Safety Stand-Down was held during the week of June 2-6, 2014, to raise awareness among employers and workers about the hazards of falls, which account for the highest number of deaths in the construction industry.

"At PC Construction, safety is our number one priority, and we work closely with OSHA to emphasize safety planning and ensure we have the right equipment on the jobsite," says Joe Barry, CHST, regional safety engineer at PC Construction, an AGC of Vermont and Carolinas AGC member. "Whether working on roofs or scaffolds, climbing ladders or working at any height, the right training and equipment can prevent falls."
 
 
         

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